Plymouth superbird history




Plymouth superbird history

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  • Plymouth introduced the Superbird in order to win at NASCAR by modifying a Roadrunner As a result the racing history of the Superbird was extinguished.

    With the success of the Dodge Charger Daytona in NASCAR, along with the other aero warriors like the fastback Ford Torinos and Mercury Cyclones, Plymouth.

    I've got a thing for Winged muscle cars: the Dodge Charger Daytona and the Plymouth Superbird, specifically. I've written quite a bit.

    Plymouth superbird history

    Plymouth superbird history

    This is why the still-born King Cobra could not be driven fast. I used to love to see a new musclecar come in on the truck for the reaction it caused. Not expecting to be able to find one of the few hemis in existence, I would be satisfied with the Super Commando as long as it had a stick shift with that handsome pistol grip. The wind external pieces would have been separate, but painted with the car, too, so the car was all painted in the normal acrylic enamel paint.

    Plymouth superbird history

    Plymouth superbird history

    Plymouth superbird history

    Plymouth superbird history

    Plymouth superbird history

    Plymouth Superbird and Dodge Charger Daytona, aero supercars

    Cars by name Trucks and Jeeps. Chrysler started experimenting with aerodynamics in the s, but not until did they release the most aerodynamic car of its time — one whose drag coefficient was not matched for many years, yet was built on an existing model with relatively few changes. The Dodge Daytona had a drag coefficient cd of just 0.

    It would have produced even less drag, if it weren't for the tall spoiler added to keep the rear wheels on the ground at high speeds , but still achieved mph set by Buddy Baker on March 24, , at The first-generation Viper, with its aerodynamic shape, had a cd of over. Even the sleek Eagle Vision had a drag of. That car set a speed record that held for 13 years, to be broken by about 1 mph in The Daytona's rear wheels tended to lose their traction, until that massive spoiler was put on, because it carried a standard cubic inch , hp engine, and air would flow under the car and lift it.

    Plymouth superbird history

    The optional powerplant was the fabled Hemi , a hp plus monster designed for racing. As a engineering student at the Chrysler Institute , I was permitted to study reports in old files while on a three-month student assignment to an Engineering Improvements Committee. In an experiment from about , a slightly modified Airflow Crown Imperial sedan was equipped with the huge nine-main-bearing inline eight and high compression about 6: It had overdrive and slight modifications of the body to reduce air drag smoothed out the headlamp eyebrows, etc.

    This was clocked at well above mph! It now sounds rather improbable, but I remember reading this report with absolute clarity after almost a half century. Even Virgil Exner understood aerodynamic principles, though production cars did not show many of the existing knowledge.

    Plymouth superbird history

    Still, some used the information that was out there. In , I was involved in the design of a very advanced race car concept for JC Penney, which wanted to get into International Sports Car racing. One of the key features of their car would be better aerodynamics. In early , I rented the University of Michigan wind tunnel for extensive tests.

    I hired University of Michigan-associated aerodynamicist Jim Amick to manage the tests and compile data into a report. Ron Martin built the wind tunnel models, and worked with Amick between runs making changes. A convenient place for such a stabilizer might be above the rear deck.

    An airfoil of inch chord mounted 20 inches about the rear deck and spanning the full width of the car would probably provide complete aerodynamic stability. Penney did not continue their interest in a race car, and following a breakup with my partner, he took a copy of Amick's Wind Tunnel Report to Texas car builder and driver Jim Hall, in exchange for a job. Larry confirmed my partner had given the wind tunnel report to Hall, and that Hall was skeptical.

    Plymouth superbird history

    Per Larry, he himself had been thinking of similar ideas, and when he read Amick's report realized they had been proven in a wind tunnel. It was Shinoda that convinced Hall it was worth a try. There is little doubt Hall and Chaparral took race car aerodynamics well beyond Amick.

    However, I think it is time the world recognized the idea did not originate with Hall. The credit should go to Jim Amick.

    1969 Dodge Daytona or 1970 Plymouth Superbird ? Pick a 426 Hemi ? on My Car Story with Lou Costabile



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