Mitsubishi evo generations




Mitsubishi evo generations

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  • Complete timeline of MITSUBISHI Lancer Evolution models and generations, with photos, specs and production years.

    The Mitsubishi Evo has progressed through ten versions (some argue more) in two decades. But which is the best? We find out.

    Sometimes it took a larger step as it switched to a new generation Lancer platform – Evo I to III were derived from the 5th generation Lancer, Evo IV to VI from the.

    Mitsubishi evo generations

    Mitsubishi evo generations

    Besides, the viscous-coupling rear LSD on the old car was replaced with a mechanical type. However, one of the producers claimed that they used a Mitsubishi Lancer Ralliart edition instead of an Evo as the car used for production and stunt scenes. The Lancer Evolution is unique among its competitors in the World Rally Championship in that it was a homologated Group A car slightly modified to be able to race competitively against the then newly formed World Rally Car WRC regulations from the season. The first Lancer Evolution used the 2.

    Mitsubishi evo generations

    Mitsubishi evo generations

    Mitsubishi evo generations

    Mitsubishi evo generations

    Mitsubishi evo generations

    Evo Generations: a tribute to the Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution - Feature Stories

    Both have a reputation for being hard-hitting, relentless athletes while also possessing nimble footwork and an ability to soak up the punishment. They have always punched well above their respective weights.

    Due to homologation rules, a minimum of 2, production models had to be built per year in order for manufacturers to compete. Thus, in October the Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution was born and proved an immediate success, with all models selling out in Japan within three days of the launch. Zero to 60mph was taken care of in 5. Just over a year after the first model was launched came the Evolution II; boasting handling improvements, a wheelbase increase of 10mm and a wider front and rear track to accommodate the larger wheels and tyres.

    Mitsubishi evo generations

    Power was up to bhp from the same motor, but the Evolution II was 10kg heavier than its predecessor, however torsional rigidity had increased by 30 per cent. New side skirts and a large rear spoiler were added to reduce lift and give the car a more bullish aura. Weight was slightly up on the previous model, with the lighter RS weighing kg and the GSR tipping the scales at kg. It utilised steering, throttle input sensors and G-force sensors to split torque via a computer-controlled differential individually to the rear wheels and increased cornering speed.

    By this point, rallying had captured the imagination of petrolheads all over the world and Mitsubishi sold Evo IVs in the first three days of its launch. Eighteen months later, Mitsubishi's development team got itchy fingers once more, leading to the new Lancer Evolution V being revealed in The car now looked much more aggressive; with flared arches, a new aluminium rear spoiler and a 10mm widened track.

    Mitsubishi evo generations

    Wheel diameter was increased from 16 to inches to swallow the larger Brembo brakes. The interior also received updated Recaro seats and slightly fresher finishing. Less than six months on from the Evo V, Mitsubishi launched the Lancer Evolution VI, with upgrades primarily focused on engine durability and cooling. It was the first time that an Evo could be bought officially in the UK, but only a small number were offered through a handful of Ralliart dealers.

    Widely regarded as the finest Lancer to wear the Evolution badge, it came in five colours — red, black, blue, white and silver. Based on the Lancer Cedia platform, it was bulkier and heavier than its predecessor, and while Mitsubishi tried to compensate with multiple chassis tweaks, the result was a car that was underwhelming compared to previous generations.

    A six-speed manual gearbox was available on the Lancer Evolution for the first time. In , the Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution X was launched.

    Mitsubishi evo generations

    The FQ was revived, too. Mated to a five-speed gearbox, the bhp Evo X could accelerate from mph in an eye-watering 3.

    Fans of the Evo won't have long to wait for its return, as Mitsubishi has confirmed a new special edition will go on sale in the UK soon. The special FQ MR comes with its peak power and torque boosted to bhp and lb ft respectively, as well as a host of other performance upgrades. History of the Mitsubishi Evo - picture special. As Mitsubishi's Evo reaches the end of its production life, we look back at the history of the performance saloon.

    Mitsubishi Evolution Generations



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